Critics bite at Hungry Jack's fat stack (Stacker)

Wednesday, September 03 2008 @ 01:02 PM EDT

Contributed by: Billy

It was only a matter of time before the media jumped on this bandwagon, and Hungry Jacks is no doubt laughing all the way to the bank. "The burger, which sells for $5.95, has no salad and the calorie content equates to more than half a woman's recommended daily energy intake and almost one-third of a man's." Hmmm so what they're telling me is that I can eat 3 of these a day? Awesome!

From: http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,24286194-2,00.html

A FAST-food chain's sale of a 4520-kilojoule hamburger is irresponsible and a sign the industry is ignoring health warnings about obesity, experts say.

[CONTINUED]


Heart attack with that? ... This burger contains four beef patties, four slices of cheese, two rashers of bacon, barbecue sauce and two sugared buns - and obesity experts are outraged.

TV commercials are promoting the Hungry Jack's Quad Stack Burger, which contains four beef patties, four slices of cheese, two rashers of bacon, barbecue sauce and two sugared buns. It contains 71g of fat, 34.7g of saturated fat, 1930 milligrams of sodium and 74.8g protein. The burger, which sells for $5.95, has no salad and the calorie content equates to more than half a woman's recommended daily energy intake and almost one-third of a man's. Dietitian Tanya Lewis said Hungry Jack's was being irresponsible in selling the new burger. "I was quite surprised that with so much media about healthy eating and the whole anti-supersize thing that they would come out and do the exact opposite," she said.

"I wasn't too impressed when I saw it on the TV, and even the people who watched it with me, who weren't dietitians, said the same thing. It was a bit like 'what are they thinking?'.

"It seems a bit irresponsible to me - even the way they're marketing it, you would think they might offer a free salad with it to try to even things up but they haven't even done that."

Since 2006, the same burger has been sold by the Hungry Jack's equivalent in the US, Burger King, sparking similar outrage there and across the globe.

In that time, companies such as McDonald's and KFC have introduced healthy alternatives on their Australian menus while providing nutrition information of their products.

Associate Professor Jane Scott, from Flinders University's Nutrition and Dietetics department, said burgers like the Quad were often marketed as a challenge.

"It challenges people to over-consume and this is just overkill," Prof Scott said.

"Once you've had one of these burgers, all you can really eat for the day is fruit and vegies as you've already reached your daily intake in most of the food groups."

Comments (0)


SupersizedMeals.com
http://www.supersizedmeals.com/food/article.php/20080903-Critics_Bite_at_Hungry_Jacks